RSA-240 Factored

2019-12-03T20:12:12
ID SCHNEIER:7613C321BEE184662E56FB15CC5BBAA9
Type schneier
Reporter Bruce Schneier
Modified 2019-12-04T09:26:27

Description

This just in:

> We are pleased to announce the factorization of RSA-240, from RSA's challenge list, and the computation of a discrete logarithm of the same size (795 bits): > > RSA-240 = 12462036678171878406583504460810659043482037465167880575481878888328 966680118821085503603957027250874750986476843845862105486553797025393057189121 768431828636284694840530161441643046806687569941524699318570418303051254959437 1372159029236099 = 509435952285839914555051023580843714132648382024111473186660296521821206469746 700620316443478873837606252372049619334517 * 244624208838318150567813139024002896653802092578931401452041221336558477095178 155258218897735030590669041302045908071447 > > [...] > > The previous records were RSA-768 (768 bits) in December 2009 [2], and a 768-bit prime discrete logarithm in June 2016 [3]. > > It is the first time that two records for integer factorization and discrete logarithm are broken together, moreover with the same hardware and software. > > Both computations were performed with the Number Field Sieve algorithm, using the open-source CADO-NFS software [4]. > > The sum of the computation time for both records is roughly 4000 core-years, using Intel Xeon Gold 6130 CPUs as a reference (2.1GHz). A rough breakdown of the time spent in the main computation steps is as follows. > > RSA-240 sieving: 800 physical core-years
RSA-240 matrix: 100 physical core-years
DLP-240 sieving: 2400 physical core-years
DLP-240 matrix: 700 physical core-years > > The computation times above are well below the time that was spent with the previous 768-bit records. To measure how much of this can be attributed to Moore's law, we ran our software on machines that are identical to those cited in the 768-bit DLP computation [3], and reach the conclusion that sieving for our new record size on these old machines would have taken 25% less time than the reported sieving time of the 768-bit DLP computation.

EDITED TO ADD (12/4): News article. Dan Goodin points out that the speed improvements were more due to improvements in the algorithms than from Moore's Law.