linux -- privilege escalation/denial of service/information leak

2013-05-15T00:00:00
ID DSA-2669
Type debian
Reporter Debian
Modified 2013-05-15T00:00:00

Description

Several vulnerabilities have been discovered in the Linux kernel that may lead to a denial of service, information leak or privilege escalation. The Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures project identifies the following problems:

vladz reported a timing leak with the /dev/ptmx character device. A local user could use this to determine sensitive information such as password length.

Andrew Honig of Google reported an issue in the KVM subsystem. A user in a guest operating system could corrupt kernel memory, resulting in a denial of service.

Oded Horovitz and Brad Spengler reported an issue in the device driver for Broadcom Tigon3 based gigabit Ethernet. Users with the ability to attach untrusted devices can create an overflow condition, resulting in a denial of service or elevated privileges.

Andy Lutomirski reported an issue in the socket level control message processing subsystem. Local users may be able to gain eleveated privileges.

Theodore Ts'o provided a fix for an issue in the ext4 filesystem. Local users with the ability to mount a specially crafted filesystem can cause a denial of service (infinite loop).

Tommie Rantala discovered an issue in the perf subsystem. An out-of-bounds access vulnerability allows local users to gain elevated privileges.

Mathias Krause discovered an issue in the userspace interface for hash algorithms. Local users can gain access to sensitive kernel memory.

Mathias Krause discovered an issue in the Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) protocol support. Local users can gain access to sensitive kernel memory.

Mathias Krause discovered an issue in the Amateur Radio AX.25 protocol support. Local users can gain access to sensitive kernel memory.

Mathias Krause discovered an issue in the Bluetooth subsystem. Local users can gain access to sensitive kernel memory.

Mathias Krause discovered an issue in the Bluetooth RFCOMM protocol support. Local users can gain access to sensitive kernel memory.

Mathias Krause discovered an issue in the Communication CPU to Application CPU Interface (CAIF). Local users can gain access to sensitive kernel memory.

Mathias Krause discovered an issue in the IrDA (infrared) subsystem support. Local users can gain access to sensitive kernel memory.

Mathias Krause discovered an issue in the IUCV support on s390 systems. Local users can gain access to sensitive kernel memory.

Mathias Krause discovered an issue in the ANSI/IEEE 802.2 LLC type 2 protocol support. Local users can gain access to sensitive kernel memory.

Mathias Krause discovered an issue in the Amateur Radio X.25 PLP (Rose) protocol support. Local users can gain access to sensitive kernel memory.

Mathias Krause discovered an issue in the Transparent Inter Process Communication (TIPC) protocol support. Local users can gain access to sensitive kernel memory.

Namhyung Kim reported an issue in the tracing subsystem. A privileged local user could cause a denial of service (system crash). This vulnerabililty is not applicable to Debian systems by default.

For the stable distribution (wheezy), this problem has been fixed in version 3.2.41-2+deb7u1.

Note: Updates are currently available for the amd64, i386, ia64, s390, s390x and sparc architectures. Updates for the remaining architectures will be released as they become available.

The following matrix lists additional source packages that were rebuilt for compatibility with or to take advantage of this update:

| Debian 7.0 (wheezy)
---|---
user-mode-linux | 3.2-2um-1+deb7u1

We recommend that you upgrade your linux and user-mode-linux packages.

Note: Debian carefully tracks all known security issues across every linux kernel package in all releases under active security support. However, given the high frequency at which low-severity security issues are discovered in the kernel and the resource requirements of doing an update, updates for lower priority issues will normally not be released for all kernels at the same time. Rather, they will be released in a staggered or "leap-frog" fashion.